You’ve agreed to do what!?

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You know when you’ve said you won’t do something to the wife/husband/partner, but deep down you know you will? And the likely reality is they know that too.  I’m already feeling the guilt curse through my body as I see my slurred answer of “yes” being written down on the back of an envelope late at night in a Thai curry house as written proof that I’ll run the Lakeland 50.  Which I’ve already agreed with my good lady wife that I won’t do.

As any long distance runner knows, It’s not the actual time for the race that is generally the problem, it’s the time for training and slotting in those long miles in training.  With a first baby due at the end of April, agreeing to an ultra in July wasn’t something I was meant to do.

In my own head, I’d decided it would be fine and that meant i was just going to have to make it work. Opportunities are there to be taken and whatever happens in the race I’d be getting to have a fantastic fifty mile “experience” of the amazing Lake District by foot and you have to be thankful if you’re in a position to be able to do that – as we know, not everyone is.

Since then I’d managed to get two big long runs in; a social lap of the 40 mile Oldham Way Ultra which I’d convinced my wife i needed to do just in case the baby arrived before the actual race day. He didn’t arrive so I found myself running the actual race as well a few weeks later with an emergency evacuation plan if needed!

Wind on a couple of months and I’m suddenly a father and running long distances hasn’t really been a feature in my life. There’s less than 8 weeks of training time now so I’ve cobbled together a vague plan and here it is.

  1. Firmly focus on training efficiency. Less social plodding in the hills around Glossop, but using time wisely around my work life. I’ve started getting off the train a few stops early and running the 10km back, or taking a lunch break to do a focused 30 mins speed session or swim at the gym.
  2. Long running is the real time-eater so I’ve decided to do no more than 20 miles in training over a period of four weeks before it’s time to start a taper. These miles will have to be done hideously early so that I’m back in time to still be able to offer something of a weekend to the family.

With as much stretching and strength work as I can fit in that’s about it. I’m sticking with a positive mental attitude on this, the race is going to be amazing no matter what happens, if I’m slow, then I’m slow. If it hurts, then…. what am I saying of course it will hurt.

The only other preparation I’ve done is peruse the checkpoint menu and wow, I see y’all at checkpoint 8!

I’m sure many of you have experienced time pressures on your running but do you take a break for a while or just work out a way to keep training!? What are your coping strategies to be most efficient with your time? Do you accidently enter races you shouldn’t have?

Watch this space for a Lakeland 50 race report, hopefully on RunUltra.

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Training Miles (Shelf Stones)

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Crying Machine (he’s lovely really)

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Montane Event and the Oldham Way Ultra x 2

It’s been a busy time at “All Hail the Trail” towers over the last few months and despite thinking I may never end up running the Oldham Way Ultra, I inadvertently ran it twice.  I’ve also sold a house in Birmingham, purchased a house in Glossop and am currently awaiting an overdue baby, when of course it will suddenly become a whole lot more chaotic.

I had the pleasure of attending the Montane showroom near Kendal a few weeks ago to try out their new Via Trail range and went for a run and interview with Debbie Martin-Cosani.  Whilst I’m still reviewing the kit which will follow in due course, here is an overview of the day on RunUltra along with an interview with Debbie (click the pic below).

So why did I run the 40 mile Oldham Way twice? The official race was on 18th March and those with good memories will remember that the UK had a somewhat unusually harsh storm – the Beast from the East.  Despite valiant efforts to get there, my buddies and I were admittedly struggling in the snow and about halfway there the race was cancelled anyway.

With the baby due on the 25th April and the rescheduled race set for the 22nd I was dubious about me being able to do it. So on Easter weekend three of us set out to do the route as a social. Forty-two social miles, half of Chadderton parkrun and a little over ten hours later and we were finished – job done.

Oldham Way Ultra “recce”

Even before my legs stopped aching my brain was contemplating how fast (or slow) I could get round in potentially drier race conditions.  After carefully planting the seed with my understanding wife she accepted that, if the baby hasn’t arrived, I could do it. On the strict conditions that I never utterred the words Oldham Way Ultra ever again.

Preparation was a bit strange, because I’d peaked then tapered for the 18th March, floundered for two weeks, ran the route as a social and then had three weeks thinking that I probably wouldn’t get the chance to run the race so just generally plodded a bit, bought baby things and spent time on the phone to mortgage providers and solicitors. It’s not the standard way to prepare for an ultra.

I’m not going to write a “full” report on the race this time.  It ended up being quite a quiet affair with around 50 entrants as unfortunately about half of the original entrants couldn’t make the new date.  This doesn’t stop the enthusiasm though and everything was looking well organised at Team OA race HQ. I ran most of the first half with a group of people but after the first 20 miles I stopped at some incredibly well timed toilets and after that I didn’t see anyone at all for the remaining 20 miles, and ended up crossing the line in 8:03.  I’d made a few navigation errors and ended up doing an extra 2 miles overall so I think the sub-8 should have been achievable.

Real life obstacle course racing

Glossopdale Harriers ready for the off

Somewhere on the Oldham Way

I’m now full speed ahead reviewing the Montane gear and the rather smart Scarpa Neutron 2’s.  Whilst there’s various races coming up on the Race List, the next biggie is the Lakeland 50.  My biggest focus needs to be on efficient training, with an imminent baby I’m clearly not going to be able to train the way I used to so its all about training “smart”.  We shall see……