Lakeland 100 – Race Report

Everything started getting a little strange from Tilberthwaite… I only had 5.5km left but with a long climb and tricky descent it was looking to be an hour and a half at least. I knew something was wrong when everything went black and white. Then shortly afterwards I kept seeing animals and faces in every rock or twisted piece of wood, vivid pigs, old men and frogs.

As I glanced into the distance, I saw a suspended cube that was lit-up and looked like it had people in it. It could be a house, a conservatory, I have no idea but it soon vanished… I began to question if I was really here or even if the race was really happening and I imagined walking into Coniston to an eerily deserted town.  I knew I’d officially lost it when I saw a blow-up snowman with long snaking wobbly arms. It turned out to be a runner in the final death march into Coniston….

As I finally completed the rocky descent I started moving along a flat track but suddenly fog descended and I was walking into nothing. I laughed as nothing made sense any more, I don’t even know if the fog was really there.

This was during the last section of the Lakeland 100 and I was moving into my second night of no sleep. I managed to finish the race in 34 hours 14 minutes 35 seconds coming in at 140th out of 265 with a starting field of around 500.

Ready to get started

I’m a very positive runner and generally love every moment out there in the hills.  I’ve done several 50-milers (including the Lakeland 50) and have always been really positive throughout and met some amazing people along the way.  But, somewhat depressingly, after completing the Lakeland 100 I don’t feel as good as I thought I would.

What affected me most of all is that it came to a point when I couldn’t run.  As I descended from Fusedale towards Hawswater, what had started as a minor knee problem became incredibly painful and every step became agony.  I almost couldn’t believe it.  I was soaking, getting cold and my back was also ripped to shreds from rubbing.  I didn’t even want to think about what was going on inside my trainers.

At this point, circa 70 miles in, I had no idea how I could ever make it to the finish so made an impulse call to my friend Immy to pick me up at the next checkpoint – I was devastated but didn’t see how I could carry on.  Thankfully it was a long trek to the checkpoint so I had time to think things through.  I began to think about all the training hours, the effect on family, the mental preparation, and the disappointment of coming back having “only” done 75 miles.  I wanted that medal and I had to do this.

I kept thinking of a Wainwright quote “You were made to soar, to crash to earth, then to rise and soar again.” I had well and truly crashed to earth and although I knew I was never going to “soar” I could probably shuffle. I had no intention of coming back – it was now or never so I decided to press on.

The next 13 hours are almost a blur of eating sandwiches, pushing reasonably well uphill, walking the flats, but using my walking poles as crutches as pain shot through my knee on every descent.  One fellow competitor told me there was only one more descent after Mardale Head.  I can reliably say that this isn’t true but, even having done this section of the route, for some reason I believed him and it probably factored in my decision to carry on.  Just one more descent.

Five or six big descents later I arrived at Tilberthwaite and had a cheese toastie thrust upon me.  Taking a few minutes to prepare I pulled on my pack for the final time and headed up Jacob’s ladder where the mind bending became most apparent.

I finally made it to the end – I had always told myself that I would run over the line no matter what so pushed into a jog before the pubs in Coniston, the pain stopped mattering, it probably even went away – I had done it – I’d completed the Lakeland 100!

A well-deserved 5am pint

The whole race was a fantastic experience and took me to places mentally, physically and emotionally I’ve never been before.  I’m still disappointed with the effect my knee had on the second half of the race, especially as it wasn’t a pre-existing issue so took me a little my surprise and meant many more hours out on the hills.

I’m incredibly proud to have battled through and ultimately make it to the end.  I have utmost respect and admiration for those that come back time and time again to do this race – it is a classic on the UK calendar and the only one that inspired me enough to actually attempt 100 miles!

It feels strange now that it’s done after the best part of a year building up to it.  I’m now looking at quite a different year next year – I’m going to identify the local classics in and around the Peak District and get those in my Calendar!

Happy boy!

Lakeland Trails 55km Race Report

“I think you’re in 12th place mate.  If you pushed a bit you could get top-10!” says a smart young chap leaning casually against a gate in the Lakes.

This is news to me because I didn’t even know if I was on the right route – I’ve been following red flags for about a kilometre when I was supposed to be following yellow.  I was nervously carrying on but had that heart-sinking feeling that I may need to back-track at any moment…

I’m around 40km into the Lakeland Trails 55km on a rather rare scorching day.  The news of a potential top-10 finish is not something I’m used to hearing and it immediately triggered a response in my brain and I knew I was going to start running like an idiot.  The front of the pack would be very spread out by now – Damien Hall was on the start line and would no doubt be leading if not already finished.  Of course, your position in any race simply depends on who turns up, but this was my moment to see if I could dig deep during those later stages and climb the ranks as much as I could.

Winding back to the start of the race at 10am it was humid – not necessarily blazing sunshine but an uncomfortable mugginess hung in the air.  This was my final “training” race before the Lakeland 100 at the end of July so I had no real expectations other than an enormous desire to finish.  I’d had a rocky start to the year with injuries which had already meant two DNS (Surrey Half and Manchester Marathon) and it would have been a big mental hit for a third to go wrong mere weeks before the biggest race I have ever taken on.

The last 6 or so weeks of training had gone reasonably well with a few runs around 20 miles but most importantly relatively consistent running five times a week, with strength and plyometrics making an appearance too.  Even though I’d only topped out at a 50-mile week, I knew this was all I could fit in around my life at the moment so it would quite simply have to do.

As we all know, the best way to start an ultra is easy paced, but of course many runners shoot off into the distance.  I’m becoming better at managing my body and knew in this heat today was going to be tough.  One of (probably my only!) strengths is my ability to walk uphill quite fast so on the first climb up I overtook a lot of people – including my clothes doppelganger who was sporting the same Ashmei top and Montane Via Trail rucksack (which I reviewed HERE).

After what seemed like a whole load of minor undulating running we arrive at the start of the climb to Grisedale Hause.  I knew this was my moment to give it a big push as it was the largest climb in the race (just before halfway).  I’d been drinking litre after litre of water so felt hydrated albeit hot so just carried on pushing hard to the top.  The descent was a technical rocky affair which suits my running so got to the bottom in good spirits.

Fast-forwarding to the later stages, whilst this was a “training race” for the Lakeland 100 in a few weeks, once I knew there was a potential for a top-10 finish, I just went for it.  It’s always hard to know just how spread out the field is, but I gradually start passing a few runners and somehow got over the line in 7th.

I’ve reflected on what helped me during those last couple of hours and I think it was largely due to body management in the early stages of the race.  I drank and ate a lot, I kept the pace steady and tried to pace hard uphill, but it all worked and kept me going to the end.

What about the race itself? Organisation is pretty good, but I would have liked to have known about the campsite arranged for the football ground more than a couple of weeks in advance – I’d already booked somewhere further afield and ended up losing my money for that.  The route, whilst hilly, had far too much tarmac for my liking and mainly weaved through valleys rather than get up on the tops.  As it was fully waymarked, I hadn’t studied the route to any level of detail so it was a bit strange not really knowing where I was (this is my fault of course).  Checkpoints were all good with a great selection of food and drink with an extra drinks station put in due to the heat.

Whilst it’s a massive mental boost when things go well, the thought of doing three-times the distance in a few weeks is terrifying.  It’s my first 100 miler, but I’ll be following the same principles – take it easy and drink/eat lots.  Perhaps equally importantly, I need to stay positive.  I love running and everything about it so don’t generally struggle with wanting to run – I just need to make sure I bring that positivity up to Coniston at the end-July!

Me and my big sister

Running up and down the Lakes

After accidentally running the Lakeland 50, I had such an amazing time that I’ve now entered the Lakeland 100 in July 2019.  I met a whole bunch of great people and felt so good during the race.  I wrote in my last post that I’d focus on efficiency with training and ran no further than 20 miles during the build-up.  Here’s my full race report on RunUltra:

https://www.runultra.co.uk/Reviews/Running-events/Europe/Lakeland-50-Race-Report

If running the length of the Lakes onces wasn’t enough, a few days ago I also completed Lakes in a Day – a 50 mile race from Caldbeck to Cartmel.  Oh, and how different it was – we battled through Storm Callum over some very testing terrain and it ended up taking me five hours longer than the Lakeland 50! I’m hoping to write a rain drenched report for RunUltra sometime soon, but here is Michelle and I at registration – how little we knew what was to come!

Start pic

I managed a few product reviews for RunUltra recently and have just received a pair of Hoka Evo Mafate to give a thorough bashing.  I’m also due to try out some Exposure Headtorches  which look great and its just the right time of year to get out in the hills in the dark!

Other recent reviews include: –

Montane Via Trail Series – https://www.runultra.co.uk/Reviews/Running-gear/Multi-product-review/Montane-Via-Trail-Series-review

Scarpa Neutron 2 – https://www.runultra.co.uk/Reviews/Running-gear/Running-shoes/Scarpa-Neutron-2-shoe-review

 

You’ve agreed to do what!?

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You know when you’ve said you won’t do something to the wife/husband/partner, but deep down you know you will? And the likely reality is they know that too.  I’m already feeling the guilt curse through my body as I see my slurred answer of “yes” being written down on the back of an envelope late at night in a Thai curry house as written proof that I’ll run the Lakeland 50.  Which I’ve already agreed with my good lady wife that I won’t do.

As any long distance runner knows, It’s not the actual time for the race that is generally the problem, it’s the time for training and slotting in those long miles in training.  With a first baby due at the end of April, agreeing to an ultra in July wasn’t something I was meant to do.

In my own head, I’d decided it would be fine and that meant i was just going to have to make it work. Opportunities are there to be taken and whatever happens in the race I’d be getting to have a fantastic fifty mile “experience” of the amazing Lake District by foot and you have to be thankful if you’re in a position to be able to do that – as we know, not everyone is.

Since then I’d managed to get two big long runs in; a social lap of the 40 mile Oldham Way Ultra which I’d convinced my wife i needed to do just in case the baby arrived before the actual race day. He didn’t arrive so I found myself running the actual race as well a few weeks later with an emergency evacuation plan if needed!

Wind on a couple of months and I’m suddenly a father and running long distances hasn’t really been a feature in my life. There’s less than 8 weeks of training time now so I’ve cobbled together a vague plan and here it is.

  1. Firmly focus on training efficiency. Less social plodding in the hills around Glossop, but using time wisely around my work life. I’ve started getting off the train a few stops early and running the 10km back, or taking a lunch break to do a focused 30 mins speed session or swim at the gym.
  2. Long running is the real time-eater so I’ve decided to do no more than 20 miles in training over a period of four weeks before it’s time to start a taper. These miles will have to be done hideously early so that I’m back in time to still be able to offer something of a weekend to the family.

With as much stretching and strength work as I can fit in that’s about it. I’m sticking with a positive mental attitude on this, the race is going to be amazing no matter what happens, if I’m slow, then I’m slow. If it hurts, then…. what am I saying of course it will hurt.

The only other preparation I’ve done is peruse the checkpoint menu and wow, I see y’all at checkpoint 8!

I’m sure many of you have experienced time pressures on your running but do you take a break for a while or just work out a way to keep training!? What are your coping strategies to be most efficient with your time? Do you accidently enter races you shouldn’t have?

Watch this space for a Lakeland 50 race report, hopefully on RunUltra.

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Training Miles (Shelf Stones)

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Crying Machine (he’s lovely really)

Montane Event and the Oldham Way Ultra x 2

It’s been a busy time at “All Hail the Trail” towers over the last few months and despite thinking I may never end up running the Oldham Way Ultra, I inadvertently ran it twice.  I’ve also sold a house in Birmingham, purchased a house in Glossop and am currently awaiting an overdue baby, when of course it will suddenly become a whole lot more chaotic.

I had the pleasure of attending the Montane showroom near Kendal a few weeks ago to try out their new Via Trail range and went for a run and interview with Debbie Martin-Cosani.  Whilst I’m still reviewing the kit which will follow in due course, here is an overview of the day on RunUltra along with an interview with Debbie (click the pic below).

So why did I run the 40 mile Oldham Way twice? The official race was on 18th March and those with good memories will remember that the UK had a somewhat unusually harsh storm – the Beast from the East.  Despite valiant efforts to get there, my buddies and I were admittedly struggling in the snow and about halfway there the race was cancelled anyway.

With the baby due on the 25th April and the rescheduled race set for the 22nd I was dubious about me being able to do it. So on Easter weekend three of us set out to do the route as a social. Forty-two social miles, half of Chadderton parkrun and a little over ten hours later and we were finished – job done.

Oldham Way Ultra “recce”

Even before my legs stopped aching my brain was contemplating how fast (or slow) I could get round in potentially drier race conditions.  After carefully planting the seed with my understanding wife she accepted that, if the baby hasn’t arrived, I could do it. On the strict conditions that I never utterred the words Oldham Way Ultra ever again.

Preparation was a bit strange, because I’d peaked then tapered for the 18th March, floundered for two weeks, ran the route as a social and then had three weeks thinking that I probably wouldn’t get the chance to run the race so just generally plodded a bit, bought baby things and spent time on the phone to mortgage providers and solicitors. It’s not the standard way to prepare for an ultra.

I’m not going to write a “full” report on the race this time.  It ended up being quite a quiet affair with around 50 entrants as unfortunately about half of the original entrants couldn’t make the new date.  This doesn’t stop the enthusiasm though and everything was looking well organised at Team OA race HQ. I ran most of the first half with a group of people but after the first 20 miles I stopped at some incredibly well timed toilets and after that I didn’t see anyone at all for the remaining 20 miles, and ended up crossing the line in 8:03.  I’d made a few navigation errors and ended up doing an extra 2 miles overall so I think the sub-8 should have been achievable.

Real life obstacle course racing

Glossopdale Harriers ready for the off

Somewhere on the Oldham Way

I’m now full speed ahead reviewing the Montane gear and the rather smart Scarpa Neutron 2’s.  Whilst there’s various races coming up on the Race List, the next biggie is the Lakeland 50.  My biggest focus needs to be on efficient training, with an imminent baby I’m clearly not going to be able to train the way I used to so its all about training “smart”.  We shall see……

Men’s Running – (Wo)Man vs Barge

It’s always great to get an article published and this month I have one in Men’s Running – A tale of running over a damp hill in at “(wo)man vs barge” !!

In other news I’ve finally entered another Ultra after a particularly disappointing 2017.  Whilst I’m not fully fit, I have until March to prepare and am keeping things ticking over with as much running/cycling as I can.  The race is Team OA’s – Oldham Way Ultra – a race I unfortunately decided not to do last year whilst training for the Liverpool to Manchester 50 miler.

We’re back in that dark season again, so here’s a picture from a short run I did this week in the dark damp Peak District.  Headtorches out again!

On the mend?

It seems like forever since I’ve run “properly”.  I spent most of 2016 training hard but 2017 has been a bit of a flop with a few races, but not to the extent I wanted due to various injury issues throughout the year.  I’m currently waiting to see a specialist and am managing to do some low mileage so keeping things ticking over.  This site isn’t about moaning though, so here’s an update of other items in All Hail The Trail world….

In an effort to defend last years (Wo)man vs Barge shock first place, I went back again this year.  To spoil the story completely, I came 9th and ate a monsterous chip butty at the end.  Full report will be published in Novembers’ Men’s Running magazine.

More gear reviews for RunUltra, here’s my thoughts on the Craft Breakaway range.  Click the pic below:

In my longest section of non-running I decided to crack on with 6 x 10km laps of the Conti Thunder Run.  For a full race report click on the link below:

For the first time I’ve also entered Cross Country for Glossopdale Harriers which hopefully will be a nice end of the year getting back into training and racing again! Onwards and upwards!