Lemon, Chicken and Rice Stew

Marathon time is here and we all know it’s wise to get some extra carbs in before race day.  What this doesn’t mean is you have to stuff your face with piles of white pasta that you’re not used to and barely anything else (which is the “advice” I’ve seen dotted round the internet).

Here’s a carb-heavy simple recipe.  Along with some bread on the side, perhaps not the white bread pictured 🙂 it makes for a nutritious meal leading up to race day.

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Ingredients

  • 2 chicken breasts (free range)
  • Several decent sized potatoes
  • Servings of rice (2-3 people)
  • 1 Courgette
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 sticks of celery
  • Large clove of garlic
  • 1 Lemon
  • Salt/Pepper
  • Bay leaves

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Method

  • Cut the chicken into small chunks and fry in a small amount of oil until lightly cooked.
  • Meanwhile chop the potatoes, courgette, celery, carrots, onion and garlic and place into a large pot along with a few bay leaves

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  • Add the cooked chicken and just about cover with water and add salt/pepper to taste.
  • Bring to the boil and then simmer for around 45 minutes.
  • Add the rice and squeeze of lemon and simmer for another 10 minutes until the rice is cooked. This should have absorbed much of the water giving a thicker texture.
  • Serve in a bowl along with bread and another squeeze of lemon.

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I generally make this, eat it, then look over and see a lemon on the worktop that I’ve forgotten. As a reminder, here is a picture of a lemon.

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TV and some Snow Running

As the new year is fading into a distant memory, it’s been relatively quiet in All Hail The Trail world. Other than a random TV appearance of course! OK it was only for a few seconds and was Freeview Channel 7 but it’s a start! It was “Photo of the Day” on the news which happened to be a rather nice view from my work desk. I put it on Twitter with a #Manchester and the channel contacted me to ask if they could use it.  Shows the power of a mere hash tag!

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The first @allhailthetrail TV appearance

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The original picture.  It was a nice view!

On to running news, the reality has now truly kicked in that I won’t be at all ready for the Oldham Way Ultra in March as I’ve had to take it really easy due to tightness in the hip.  18 miles a week an ultrarunner does not make.  I’m progressing though and trying to remain sensible and planning a gradual build up to make sure I’m ready for races later in the year…. next stop Liverpool to Manchester in April, I hope.

I’ve also ticked off my first “proper” trail run since moving to Glossop it was tough, not due to distance, but weather.  The observant amongst us will notice it’s been snowing….. and in the Peak District it was snowing a lot!  I started gently due to my hip but it seemed to ease off as I ascended towards the summit of Cock Hill (mainly walking to be honest).

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The weather got more and more extreme and as I ran over towards Clough Edge and I began to go blind in my right eye as the snow and wind battered the muscles around my right eye socket and eye lid.  I started to have one of those strange moments of euphoria as nature was showing me who was boss.

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I continued down into the relative calmness of the Longdendale Trail and along the road back into Glossop.

Talking of Glossop a final picture of the view from my spare bedroom window.  What a change from City Centre Living!

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Lots more planned for this site and a great carb loading recipe coming up soon for all the marathon runners – chicken, lemon and rice stew.  White pasta gorgers move along, there’s nothing for you here!

Alternative Run Types

Most runners are well aware of the different training run types; threshold, intervals, long-slow run and the like, but during training I’ve noticed some alternatives that I, and others, are guilty of….
Friday pub avoidance run

A really sensible one to start with. Work colleagues have been jostling around all afternoon mentioning there might be a sneaky few after work.  You want to and you’re probably going to.  But then in a bizarre twist, miraculously you decline the kind offer and end up going a run.  It doesn’t matter that you’ll be hitting the booze later on anyway – because you’ve earnt it!  Note:  This is a lesser-spotted run usually beaten by “popping in for one” after work, arriving home around 11pm armed with chips and an apologetic look on your face.

This had better sort out the hangover run

Usually undertaken when you failed to complete the “Friday Pub avoidance run”.  It all went wrong and you’re mad with yourself, but these things happen so you drag yourself out of bed, don the trainers and hit the streets like a greased cougar.  That was the plan anyway but you find yourself running at a slight angle with one eye half closed as every last drop of moisture is sweated out of your battered body, but you plough on and by the time you get back and whip up an avocado and poached egg on toast (this can sometimes happen) all seems right with the world and you can crack on with the weekend.

This type of run is also sometimes referred to as “Parkrun”.

I’m injured but I’m going running anyway run

Definitely one to avoid, but with all your buddies out marathon training and hitting intervals like crazy you feel like a school kid in detention with his nose pressed up against the window watching the others play football outside.  You’ve had a niggle that’s recurring, but your  love of all things running means you go out anyway.  Just tentatively you tell yourself, but after a while things seems ok and you crank up the pace and the pain is back…..  We should all remember that its better to wait until you’re fully recovered rather than leap back in too soon and prolong getting back on track.  Easier said than done, but you know it makes sense.

Every one is pissing me off at work run

The boss has been all over your case, and you’ve put in enough hours to have the rest of the month off.  You get home and stomp around trying to find all your running gear which seems to have been strewn around the house.  Finally you’re all tooled up, and get out to pound the streets. No one can stop you now, especially not with “90’s anthems” pumping down your eager ears. You’re guaranteed to get a good pace on this one as you work the stress out of your body.  You’ll come back calm and relaxed and ready for another day of work tomorrow…. I think.

Getting out of the house to avoid the housework run

The wife is pointing out every uncompleted chore in the house.  You’ve had a shelf waiting to go up for months and the washing up is piled high like some slithering sea monster.  Little clumps of running clothes lurk around various corners of the house. But you shrug your shoulders and knowingly glance over to your race training plan sellotaped to the fridge. It’s written down and if you don’t do it, your entire race strategy will fall apart.  

It’s all worth it though, because on race day when you heroically cross the line in 2,754th the missus will be so proud and all of this will be forgotten.  Probably….

Recipe: Sweet Potato, Beef and Lentil Stew

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Here’s a nice winter warmer, really easy, packed with plenty of veg and sweet potato, served with kale on the side.

Ingredients

120g red lentils (soaked)
250g lean minced beef
1 Sweet Potato cut into cubes
2 Cloves Garlic
2 carrots
1 stick celery
2 large mushrooms
Salt/Pepper
Chopped parsley
400g tin tomatoes
Red wine
Water
Stock Cube
Kale

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Some of the ingredients ready for cooking

Method

Parboil the potatoes for around 10 min whilst frying the onion, beef, carrots and garlic till the mince is browned.

Add all other ingredients (other than the kale) and mix well.  Add water and a splash of red wine to just about cover the ingredients.

Bring to the boil and then simmer for 40-50 mins until the sauce has thickened.

Steam/boil the kale for a few mins and serve.

Easing into the New Year

Its been a tough start to the New Year in a “1st world problems” type of way because I haven’t been able to get into the training that I wanted.

At the end of November I completed my longest ever race, the Wendover Woods 50.  It went better than planned.  I kept a reasonably consistent pace throughout the whole very hilly 50 miles, finished without any blisters, or “serious” pain other than the fully anticipated tired/aching muscles.  Stairs were a problem for two days, but after that I did a small bit of tentative running on a treadmill and all seemed ok.

Within two weeks, a friend was coming back to visit and before I knew it I was on a hilly two hour trail run in the Peaks.  It was great.  Apart from my hip.  And my feet.  Since Wendover I seemed to have developed various problems – significant tightness in the hip, pain in the top of both feet, dodgy shoulder and sore coccyx. Perhaps I’m not as “ultra-ready” as I though I was!

Anyway, this site isn’t about moaning, so I’ve been on “active” recovery i.e. a few very slow runs, some HIIT work, lots of stretching and foam rolling, basically anything which doesn’t bring back any recurring problems.

It’s a odd time of the year to be doing it though as everyone has suddenly gone fitness crazy.  I feel like a school kid in detention, nose pressed against the window, watching all the other kids play football outside.  Marathon plans have started, gyms are bulging at the seams, and parkrun attendance figures have shot up.  My running friends are building up the mileage for spring races and banging out interval training like its gone out of fashion, but I’m worried to accelerate above anything that might break a sweat!  But actually, I’m kind of easing back into it now, I’ve had a (very painful) phsyio session recently which has helped and kept the runs sensible and am feeling ready to start ramping things up which is great!

So in summary I need to (wo)man up and get back into being an……

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Final couple of updates, knowing that I’m moving to Glossop shorty, I’ve planned my run-commute! A mere 25km from Manchester City, through Ashton-under-Lyne, Stalybridge, Hadfield and into Glossop.  Its got a “lighter-nights” feel about it though, but i’m looking forward to doing it!  Click the pic for the Strava route!

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I’ve also updated my Race Results page, just into a more easily readable table format.  Definitely looking forward to developing this site further with a few new recipes and routes!

Until next time…

What next….. ?

Now that Project Trail is over, I thought I’d write a short piece on the overall experience and what I have planned next.  Project Trail has been well documented – I’ve written several blog pieces on the Men’s Running site (see HERE) and a report on the Wendover Woods 50 itself HERE.  There’s also been monthly interviews in Men’s Running during the build-up and then a final interview after the race (pictured).  I do feel somewhat sad it’s over as it was really great to be involved in something that was included in national magazine.

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Getting free gear was, of course, fantastic and the Columbia Montrail clothes/trainers really suit me, so when they do eventually wear out I’ll certainly be hunting out some more.  The training from Robbie Britton was great, especially during the last couple of months – I picked up some great tips and having a coach really drives you to not skip any sessions.  The final build-up had five days a week running, which I probably wouldn’t have done left to my own devices.  Probably the greatest lesson I’ve learnt is eating/drinking – with an ultra-race you just need to fuel, fuel, fuel.  I think this is what enabled me to finish the last lap not much slower than the first. 

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So now Project Trail is miles-under-the-bridge, what next?

My last post was about preparing for The Drop, a race with no map, compass, route, GPS where you just have to find your way back (Team OA).  I’ve written a race report which will be published in Men’s Running March edition (out end-Jan), so I’m really pleased that I’ve been able to get a couple of articles published outside of Project Trail (Man vs. Mountain HERE).  I’ll certainly be exploring how/if I can get more writing published with Men’s Running or elsewhere.

I couldn’t have a site entitled All Hail The Trail and continue to live in Manchester City Centre so at the start of February I’m moving to Glossop in Derbyshire on the edge of the Peak District.  I’m really looking forward to it and have already joined the Glossopdale Harriers so will begin training with them in earnest shortly.  I also hope to become a regular at the Glossop parkrun with an aim to get my 50 parkrun t-shirt by the end of the year (I’ve done 27 to-date).

Along with that I also have a few races booked, Oldham Way Ultra 40 miles in March, Liverpool to Manchester 50 miles in April and the Lakeland Trails 110km in July.  I’m suffering with a bad hip at the moment so I’m not building up the training as much as I’d like to right now, but such is life and I’ll have to see if I’m ready for the OWU……

I’ll also be developing this site to contain more recipes, routes, short gear reviews, race reports and any other running related thoughts.  Anyone please feel free to contact me on anything related to this site, any opportunities for running/writing/blog collaboration or anything else that may be of interest!

Preparing for The Drop

In a couple of days time I’m running a race.  Not just any old race, but one that’s going to be very difficult and it probably won’t go very well.  The race in question is called The Drop (by Team OA).  The fun starts in Huddersfield where you are blindfolded and driven to an undisclosed location, ten-miles away (as the crow flies), and then released at two minute intervals.  First one back to Huddersfield wins.

The high-tech generation may merely shrug their shoulders and wonder where the problem is with that.  Well, Google-mappers, no phones are allowed.  Or GPS watches.  Or maps/compass.  The race organisers will have strapped a GPS tracker onto us so they can observe (laugh) at the various routes we “decide” to take.  You can follow it here:

http://live.opentracking.co.uk/decdrop16/#

I don’t feel in a strong position for this one.  I’m completely full of Christmas dinner and I’ve only ever been to Huddersfield once, and am not at all familiar with the area.  Or any of the areas within a ten-mile radius for that matter……

There’s been all sorts of pub-talk on the strategy for this; following the sun, memorising the route the van takes, friends sending out carrier pigeons if I’m going the wrong way, Prison Break style tattoos and even zen-style just “feeling” the way.  Other runners could be sent in the wrong direction by planting decoys giving wrong directions or rotating road signs.  Some have even suggested that I must be the first person to ever try and run back to Huddersfield 🙂

I certainly wont be cheating so my only strategy can be to start to run in a random direction and hope to find something (or someone) that will tell me the way!!!

I’m writing an article on this race for Men’s Running so check out the mag (out end of January) to see how it went!

Finally here’s a couple of pics I took walking in Waseley Country Park on Boxing Day.  For no other reason other than its nice over there and it was a lovely day!

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Recipe: Steak Tagliatelle with Spinach and Roasted Vegetables

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Here is a fantastic pre-race recipe from www.boredofdiets.wordpress.com @boredofdiets1

Published with full permission, I’ve eaten this and similar variants before many of my races.  Tasty, nutritious and has served me well.  Give it a try!

Ingredients

Serves 2

1 sirloin steak sliced with fat trimmed off (or steak of your choice – ribeye is good too)
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 garlic clove – crushed, chopped or sliced
1 tablespoon of oregano
1 tin of chopped tomatoes
1 red chili – finely chopped
1 red pepper – sliced
10 cherry tomatoes
a couple of handfuls of spinach
140g /200g of tagliatelle (200g is only if you are having it as a pre-race dinner)
40g of cheddar or cheese of your choice (mozzarella would work well too)

Method
Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees. First put the cherry tomatoes and sliced red pepper in an oven proof dish and drizzle over the olive oil. Put this in the oven and let them roast for around half an hour.

In the mean time heat a teaspoon of olive oil in a pan on a medium heat and fry the sliced steak for a few minutes until the meat is browned. Remove the steak from the pan and put on a plate to one side.

Next put the garlic and chili in the pan, add the tinned tomatoes and oregano and let it simmer on a low heat, stirring occasionally.

About 10 minutes before the roasted vegetables are ready, bring a pan of water to the boil and cook the tagliatelle according to the instructions, normally for around 5 minutes.

Whilst the tagliatelle is cooking add the spinach to the pan with the simmering tinned tomatoes, stir in for a few minutes until it wilts. Then add the steak back in to the pan, mix it all together for a couple of minutes, making sure the steak is heated through and then turn off the heat.

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When the roasted vegetables are done take them out and add the steak and tomato mixture to the dish and mix. Next add the tagliatelle and mix thoroughly, then sprinkle the cheese on top.

Return the dish to the oven for a couple of minutes to let the cheese melt, then serve

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Wendover Woods 50 miler

“Space is big. Really big. You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it’s a long way down the road to the chemist, but that’s just peanuts to space.” Douglas Adams – The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

You could be accused of being over dramatic if you replaced the word “space” above with “Wendover Woods 50” but for those who did it, at times it felt like it.  But anyway, I’m jumping ahead of myself…..

The wait was over, the training was done, the miles were in the bank and there was no more time for worrying.  The Wendover woods 50 mile race was here and I started brilliantly by stepping out of my car, in a cold field in Tring at 7am, into a giant poo.  Undeterred, I squelched my way to the start line and looked around for the other Project Trail guys.  Soon meeting up with Nic and Jon, we were a mixture of excitement, compression gear and fear.  Glancing around the field I could tell this was for the big boys, with the Centurion Running Grand Slam title at stake some people were going to be flying round this.

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Project Trail 2016: Daniel Stinton, Nic Porter, Jon Gurney

The Wendover Woods 50 is, as the name suggests, “a 50 mile foot race consisting of 5 x 10 mile loops on forest trails, entirely within Wendover Woods”.  Just for fun though, nestled within those beautiful sounding woodland trail laps was 2,900m of climbing.  Which, I can now tell you from experience, is a lot.  The race organisers, Centurion Running, had tactfully named some of the sections; “Hell’s Road”, “The Snake” and “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” presumably to somehow keep the spirits up!

Since winning a place in this race from Men’s Running and their Project Trail feature, the pressure was on.  We’d been featured in the last five issues of the magazine to report on our progress and had training plans devised by Robbie Britton (Team GB Ultrarunner) to get us all ready for the day ahead.  I’d trained hard, and had some great races and running experiences along the way, but nevertheless earlier in the week did have quite a flap about my ability to actually run 50 miles.  By the time race day arrived, I’d decided to put those worries behind me and thought the best tactic was to just get on with it.  I had a proper “plan” for this one; eat as much as I possibly can, drink as much as I possibly can, take it easy at the start and finish strong.

I knew that the first couple of laps just needed ticking off, and the Project Trail guys and I had suggested we start together.  This was great to take it reasonable easy, have a chat, keep the spirits up and get used to the course.  During the start of the third lap I slowly peeled away and realised it was time to go this alone.  The laps consisted of magnificent forest trails, some mud and numerous short(ish) sharp climbs.

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All very happy because we’re going downhill

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I took the opportunity to have 30 seconds rest by pretending I needed to take some photos

Somewhere around the third lap I saw Gary Dalton, an ultrarunner I’d met the previous year at the Adidas Thunder Run.  He was doing a couple of laps in reverse as moral support for the runners and our exchange went something along the lines of……

“Hi Dan, how you feeling?” said the self-confessed moany trail runner.  I gave an honest reply saying that I was feeling pretty good.

“Well why are you walking then!?” came the response.  I processed this for a few moments and came to the conclusion it was a very good question, so run I did.

… and so the day went on, taking each section as it came.  At one point during the “Power Line” segment I emerged into a large open field.  This is a brief pleasant change to the woodland trails and due to the time of day, the sun was coming down bathing the woodland surroundings in a beautiful light.  I actually outstretched my arms and leant my head back, either praying to the Great Running God, or to take in as much vitamin D as I possibly could.  As I crossed the field I bumped into my number-neighbour (284), a young lady who I can see from the results was Rachel Dench.  We had a quick chat and I started wittering on about what a fantastic moment this was and hopefully sharing some of my current positivity.  A short while later, re-entering the woods, we shared some jelly beans and and I was on my way.

In a bizzare mind-game I was actually looking forward to lap four.  Well past the halfway point I’d already decided this was going to be a self-indulgent lap so I put my headphones on some to blast out some of my favourite songs and really started gritting my teeth to get round.  I had a couple of moments of euphoria during this lap as I knew I was well on my way to complete it, and nothing was going to stop me.  I was doing my two favourite things, running in the woods and listening to some crushing metal and hip hop, I had a few moments of dancing and punching the air – sorry to anyone who saw that and thought I’d gone barking mad but in some ways I think I probably had.

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Ten miles to go.  Feeling the burn.

Finally I was at the business end of the race and strapping on a headtorch for the final lap.  This one needed a bit of focus as tiredness was setting in and you really had to concentrate to stay on track through the winding woodland paths, but it has to be said the course markings by Centurion Running were excellent.  I started the lap with a nice chap called Mick and we had a good chat but I soon pushed along and ended up running most of this lap alone. The field had really spread out by now so other humans were few and far between.  After a final push during the viciously steep last 2km, suddenly (well, more accurately, 11 hours, 2 minutes and 15 seconds later) I was over the finish line.  My friend, and top-running buddy Michelle, had come along to the end for moral support and was probably twice as cold as I was, so massive thanks for making an appearance!  Immediately people were thrusting medals, t-shirts and minestrone soup at me, which was a great way to finish.  The whole Project Trail experience has been fantastic, its magnificent to have completed it, but of course I’m slightly sad its over.  Not one to mope, I can now enjoy a little relax and look forward to the ultras I already have booked for next year.  Game on!

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Cold and needing a beer……  I was a bit chilly as well.

A few of the details and stats below for the true running geeks:

I finished in 43rd place with the laps times below:

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I think the main thing I’m pleased with (other than finishing!) is that my laps were reasonably consistent. OK, I slowed down a bit for the fourth lap but then somehow negative split the last one in the dark with a head torch.  Despite the inevitable tiredness I just wanted to get this lap done.

Not that I’m an expert at these things but I definitely learnt a few things during this race and got great advice from Robbie Britton.  Here’s some summary thoughts, a mixture of my own experience and advice given:

  • De-hydration will shut you down.  Drink, drink and drink some more.  I added electrolytes to my pack at every lap when I filled up.
  • Lack of nutrition will shut you down.  Eat, eat and eat some more.  Right from the start.  I really followed points one and two even when I didn’t feel like it, and have to say I felt as energised as could be expected.
  • Stay positive.  People had talked to me about “dark times” on these long ultra runs but I decided I was having none of that.  I tried to stay happy, be positive, talk to people, have a laugh at the aid stations (which were great)and just keeping moving and enjoy each lap.  Its what we’ve been working towards and looking forward to for so long, so why not enjoy it!?
  • Get everything right during training.  I had a definite plan on the type of foods that agree with me and had a load of it with me on this run.  However, I caved in to a ham sandwich on white bread at one of the aid stations that sat uncomfortably somewhere in my digestive system for at least an hour.  Know what you can eat.  And eat it.
  • A more personal one, but I discovered one of the best things about my running is my walking.  I realised I can get a really good march on, even on the steep sections which probably helped me climb from 84th place on lap 1 to 43rd at the end.
  • I’m going to go all Matrix on you, but you have to believe Neo!!!🙂🙂🙂

Finally, a quick shout-out to all the people and gear that have helped me along this; Men’s Running Magazine, Rick Pearson, Isaac Williams, Robbie Britton, TrainAsONE, Centurion Running (the organisation, marshals, aid stations and route markings were brilliant), Michelle Edye for the solid running training and chat, Johnny Fuller (Sporting Therapy), Columbia Montrail, TomTom, Adidas Eyewear, Petzl head torches and High5 nutrition.

And to the other project trail guys, Nic Porter and Jon Gurney (and support and photographs from Chris) – fantastic effort all round and achievement for us all! And of course Vicky Stinton for putting up with my continuous training and talking about running!