On the mend?

It seems like forever since I’ve run “properly”.  I spent most of 2016 training hard but 2017 has been a bit of a flop with a few races, but not to the extent I wanted due to various injury issues throughout the year.  I’m currently waiting to see a specialist and am managing to do some low mileage so keeping things ticking over.  This site isn’t about moaning though, so here’s an update of other items in All Hail The Trail world….

In an effort to defend last years (Wo)man vs Barge shock first place, I went back again this year.  To spoil the story completely, I came 9th and ate a monsterous chip butty at the end.  Full report will be published in Novembers’ Men’s Running magazine.

More gear reviews for RunUltra, here’s my thoughts on the Craft Breakaway range.  Click the pic below:

In my longest section of non-running I decided to crack on with 6 x 10km laps of the Conti Thunder Run.  For a full race report click on the link below:

For the first time I’ve also entered Cross Country for Glossopdale Harriers which hopefully will be a nice end of the year getting back into training and racing again! Onwards and upwards!

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Gear Reviews

I’d always intended to post various gear reviews on here, but didn’t actually get round to it.  Since then I’ve had a kind offer from RunUltra to undertake some reviews for their site.  It’s early days yet but here’s a couple just published, one on running gear newbie, Ripl, who have an interesting concept to encourage people to run and the second on the Scott Jurek FKT vest.  Click the pics to see the review.

Also coming up is my review of some other gear from Craft Sportswear

Click pic above

Click pic above

Hopefully lots more to come.

The Dreaded DNS

I’ve just started doing some writing for “RunUltra” a great website dedicated to ultrarunning.  Unfortunately I didn’t start the Lakeland Trail 110km so wrote about my feeling on a DNS, click on the pic below:

Check out all the great articles, training, events etc. from the main page:

I’ve also started to do a few gear reviews for them, so i’ll link to them soon!

DNS… DNF… Do Not Know!

On Friday, I’m probably kind of, sort of, potentially running an ultra.  This year I’d opted for the Lakeland Trail 110km as my “A-race” but after a magnificent 2016, this year has seemed to just been plod along with a few niggles here and there, not bad enough to stop training completely, but not really the level of training I wanted to do to go into this strongly.  But a week ago I suddenly started getting a very tight hip and a few shooting pains on the one side – I immediately put the brake on running and have had a few tentative treadmill jogs over the last few days but am still getting some tightness and some pain…. 5 days before my A-race….

Its times like now we’re faced with a difficult decision.  Can I really run 110km in this condition? If not, is it worth starting?  If i do start what if i just make myself worse and ruin running later in the year?  The next few days will tell with some pilates and a physio session ahead of me, rest, good food and hopefully lots of sleep.  Come on Ultimate Trails, I wanna have a go at ya!

Shelf Stones – Superfortress

I took a trip up to Shelf Stones earlier to the crash site of “Over-Exposed!”, an RB29 Superfortress which crashed on Bleaklow on 3rd November 1948.  Whilst running and “proper” photography don’t really mix, I really wanted a few pictures so took these on my phone and tried a bit of tweaking when I got back.

For any more info on the crash click this link – http://aircrashsites.co.uk/superfortress-44-6199-over-exposed-2/

The total route was around 14km from the centre of Glossop.  I headed up to Old Glossop and took the route up Lightside and over towards Shelf Stones, with the crash site a few hundred metres away but you could easily miss it (unbelievably).  I came back down quite randomly (access land) working my way down to Doctor’s Gate and back to Glossop.  It was a great run with fantastic views from Lightside and Doctors Gate, and of course the wreck itself.

Liverpool to Manchester 50 miler Report

I’m not a morning runner.  I’m not even a moaning runner, but I do moan about mornings.  Especially 4am ones somewhere on the outskirts of Liverpool.  Of course, it’s a lot easier to get up for exciting things such as jetting off on a remote holiday.  Or running an ultra.

As is the norm with such races I’m standing in the middle of a field with a bunch of compression clad warriors decked from head-to-toe with the latest stretch fabric, multi-bottle, hydro-ultra-tech-lightweight rucksacks crammed with expensive waterproofs that no-one wants to actually use.

This is the Liverpool to Manchester Ultra Marathon, a 50 mile jaunt along the Trans Pennine Trail (TPT) starting close to Aintree in Liverpool and finishing in Didsbury in Manchester.  For those who have a strange desire to run back to Liverpool there is 100 mile option (on a different date).

Silence falls over the field for a minute in honour of Stephen Carragher before an enthusiastic cowbell signals the start of the race.  My strategy is to take it easy at the start, running around a 6 minute kilometre, but knowing I’ll slow down and hopefully finish in 8-9 hours.  Others clearly have different plans as I glance concerningly at a stocky fellow powering past me during the first kilometre huffing and puffing like a steam train.  I hope he didn’t misread the distance when he entered this one……

The marked route was easy enough to follow although it soon begins to blur into one, moving from long sections of road/tarmac to basic trails.  Suddenly, out of nowhere, a smell permeated my nostrils that is so foul my carefully planned nutrition strategy is almost ruined but I know immediately where I am.

Widnes.

I had experienced this smell some 18 years earlier when I worked there for several months and it was almost like I’d never left.  My pace quickens as I continue out of the area into the fresh air beyond.

As an extra twist the race organisers have offered up Gold medals to the top 50 finishers, silver for 51-100 and bronze for all finishers after that.  Deep-down I want a gold medal but as the pack thins I don’t really have any idea of my position, so I just concentrate on moving forwards.

Ultras are a great social experience and I chat to loads of people along the route, many saying this is their second time at the L2M after the inaugural one last year.  Somewhere after halfway I start running with Dave Fort from Burnley (more accurately Padiham), and we soon stick together to start ticking off the miles and discussing how we felt about the race so far.  In one of those “small-world” moments, it turns out Dave knows my auntie, but then I imagine most people in Padiham know my auntie, but that’s a different story altogether……

Men being such fine examples of humanity, we soon start discussing how “stomach problems” can become an issue on ultras.  Earlier on I’d made a rather horrific trip to the bushes which emotionally I hadn’t yet recovered from.  Dave casually announced he just popped in to a luxurious Premier Inn (I’m still dubious about the existence of this) along the way which made my hunt for a secluded spot seem ludicrous. Note to self – mark Premier Inn’s on race maps in future.

With around 25km to go, one of the friendly aid station volunteers let slip that Dave, myself and Paul Carse (who we’d also spent some time running with) were in 42nd, 43rd and 44th position.  Now this is serious!  We know there is a lot of time to gain some places, but also plenty of time to lose some places.  The focus moves on to keeping position, so with military type enthusiasm I scoff another pork pie and we plough on.  Our heads regularly spin around like paranoid owls as we keep checking if anyone is on our tail.  Occasionally runners crept into our rear view so we push on as hard as we can knowing that our gold medals are at stake.

We have a minor panic towards the end as we took a couple of wrong turnings but emerged victoriously into the final field where, in one last cruel twist, the route continues past the finish, around a large field before crossing the finish line.  Job done.  I complete it in 41st position in 8 hours 43 minutes.

Can you order me a lager please?

So how would I rate this race?  The organisation was top-notch, especially considering the three recces to covering the entire route offered in advance.  There was lots of social media buzz, plenty of information sent out and a true enthusiasm towards getting people through an ultra.  Reflecting on the route I’ve realised I like to be inspired by running down a valley, remote woodland trails, or climbing a peak to witness natures beauty stretch out below.  Whilst you won’t get this at the L2M, what you will get is a solidly organised race, huge support at the aid stations and a great crack at a 50 mile PB!  Thanks GBUltras!

Pimp my medal

Free Running?

I just started adding up what I’ve spent on running and swiftly gave up so as to not cause serious fluctuations on my Garmin HR monitor.  I enjoy gadgets, buying new stuff and seem to delve quite deeply into a “hobby”, so taking up running was a recipe for credit card trauma.

Of course, on the purest scale running is free.  A simple pair of trainers, which most of us own anyway, and jogging round the block is as cheap as it can get.  No matter how obvious this is, many of us can’t help gazing longingly at all the new running gadgetry available, with promises of better performance, more statistics and a vague possibility of looking like a running magazine cover model.

Then what about races themselves?  I added up the cost of doing a 15km trail race in the Lake District a couple of years ago – whilst the entry fee was around £30, I spent another £470 hiring cars, hotel, eating out etc.  Of course there would have been cheaper ways to do it, but I imagine many of us often way exceed the entry fee.

So is all this spending necessary and could we get away without it all?  Well of course as runners haven’t always had access to such kit, but if I’m out for several hours on the trail then a certain amount of kit is sensible to keep me comfortable and safe.  It does start to add up; trail shoes, tops, shorts, baselayers, rucksacks, watches/GPS (at one point I went out running with three watches …… there was a reason honestly), nutrition/gels, race entries and associated costs.

So how much is too much? As with any hobby, is there a point where it becomes beyond reasonable? I think so and if it comes to the point where you’re spending more time reading about and/or buying kit than actually running then clearly it’s become a problem.  But if you can afford it, then does it matter?  Maybe not, but if all the purchases are an attempt to enhance performance if you haven’t already nailed the fundamentals of training and nutrition, then you really need to consider your priorities.

In this modern world with endless tech being released all the time and the internet thrusting it all down our throats with modest performance gains offered to all levels of runners, it’s no wonder our cupboards are bursting at the seams with trainers!

I suppose I should be thankful that I’m not a triathlete.